The Den

I don't even know anymore
Oct 18 '14

shouldnt:

that awkward moment when you like the teacher that everyone hates

Oct 18 '14
faeizumine:

I LOVE THAT THE DEVIANTART IS REAL

faeizumine:

I LOVE THAT THE DEVIANTART IS REAL

Oct 18 '14
Oct 18 '14

mayor-mossy:

querycrossing:

me.

wait why was he the bad guy i dont understand

Glanni Glæpur, borgarstjóri Latabæjar

Oct 18 '14
anti-social-jaguar:

quirkdemon:

tuxedoangel:

teapotsahoy:

Yes, good, correct use of train technology.

This is so cool……

she’s a dragon
she’s a dragon

Reminds me of Skyrim when you slay dragons and there’re all bones.

anti-social-jaguar:

quirkdemon:

tuxedoangel:

teapotsahoy:

Yes, good, correct use of train technology.

This is so cool……

she’s a dragon

she’s a dragon

Reminds me of Skyrim when you slay dragons and there’re all bones.
Oct 18 '14

castiel-is-wonderful:

sionainnlindsay:

castiel-is-wonderful:

WAIT HOLD THE FUCK UP

IS ‘MRS’ JUST MR’S 

LIKE BELONGING TO MR

OMG

Mr comes from the French monsieur, which I think literally translates as ‘my lord’ and basically just means master, and Mrs comes from maistre which is the feminine form of master, so actually—for once—no.

This was an extremely relevant comment and I thank you for educating me 

(Source: khaleeesii)

Oct 18 '14

weloveshortvideos:

Baguette Hitman

Oct 18 '14

theectoplasmicemily:

theectoplasmicemily:

I fucking just saw a flyer about ending “Christphobia” and I’m not even joking like I took a picture and I have no idea what to do with this incredible gem and it’s killing me

image

i wish i was joking

Oct 18 '14
pizzaotter:

jodyrobots:

if i were a nun I would wear heelies and glide everywhere just to fuck with people

NO DONT DO THAT

pizzaotter:

jodyrobots:

if i were a nun I would wear heelies and glide everywhere just to fuck with people

NO DONT DO THAT

(Source: ds0tm)

Oct 18 '14
theodorepython:

rameninblack:

something is seriously wrong with these icons like
the designs make 0 sense they are not indicative of their function (with the exception of text, link and video) 
the icons for link and chat are virtually identical 
the icon for text is noticeably smaller looking and feels off-centered compared to the other icons
did tumblr do this as a joke? did someone make a mistake? i’m genuinely curious because these icons are incredibly ineffective and poorly designed

They changed them back in less than 10 minutes but please let this post live forever as a testament to the staff’s poor decision.

theodorepython:

rameninblack:

something is seriously wrong with these icons like

the designs make 0 sense they are not indicative of their function (with the exception of text, link and video) 

the icons for link and chat are virtually identical 

the icon for text is noticeably smaller looking and feels off-centered compared to the other icons

did tumblr do this as a joke? did someone make a mistake? i’m genuinely curious because these icons are incredibly ineffective and poorly designed

They changed them back in less than 10 minutes but please let this post live forever as a testament to the staff’s poor decision.

Oct 18 '14

demaskingtape:

weetoiletpaperroll:

coldsoymilk:

the last one tho

who is this guy. i feel like he speaks to the depths of my very soul. especially today.

I agree w/ all but the one on ambition, dream as big as possible and let your ambitions mirror that. There’s no shame in having a lot of ambition.

(Source: opencult)

Oct 13 '14

likeafieldmouse:

The First Photograph of a Human Being

"This photograph of Boulevard du Temple in Paris was made in 1838 by Louis Daguerre, the brilliant guy who invented the daguerreotype process of photography.

Aside from its distinction of being a super early photograph, it’s also the first photograph to ever include a human being.

Because the image required an exposure time of over ten minutes, all the people, carriages, and other moving things disappear from the scene. However, in the bottom left hand corner is a man who just so happened to stay somewhat still during the shot — he was having his shoes shined.”

Oct 13 '14
knowledgeistreasure:

Anaximander (c.610—546 B.C.E.)
" Anaximander was the author of the first surviving lines of Western philosophy. He speculated and argued about "the Boundless" as the origin of all that is. He also worked on the fields of what we now call geography and biology. Moreover, Anaximander was the first speculative astronomer. He originated the world-picture of the open universe, which replaced the closed universe of the celestial vault…By speculating and arguing about the "Boundless" he was the first metaphysician. By drawing a map of the world he was the first geographer. But above all, by boldly speculating about the universe he broke with the ancient image of the celestial vault and became the discoverer of the Western world-picture.The history of written Greek philosophy starts with Anaximander of Miletus in Asia Minor, a fellow-citizen of Thales. He was the first who dared to write a treatise in prose, which has been called traditionally On Nature. This book has been lost, although it probably was available in the library of the Lyceum at the times of Aristotle and his successor Theophrastus. It is said that Apollodorus, in the second century BCE, stumbled upon a copy of it, perhaps in the famous library of Alexandria. Recently, evidence has appeared that it was part of the collection of the library of Taormina in Sicily, where a fragment of a catalogue has been found, on which Anaximander’s name can be read. Only one fragment of the book has come down to us, quoted by Simplicius (after Theophrastus), in the sixth century AD. It is perhaps the most famous and most discussed phrase in the history of philosophy….” http://www.iep.utm.edu/anaximan/

knowledgeistreasure:

Anaximander (c.610—546 B.C.E.)


" Anaximander was the author of the first surviving lines of Western philosophy. He speculated and argued about "the Boundless" as the origin of all that is. He also worked on the fields of what we now call geography and biology. Moreover, Anaximander was the first speculative astronomer. He originated the world-picture of the open universe, which replaced the closed universe of the celestial vault…By speculating and arguing about the "Boundless" he was the first metaphysician. By drawing a map of the world he was the first geographer. But above all, by boldly speculating about the universe he broke with the ancient image of the celestial vault and became the discoverer of the Western world-picture.

The history of written Greek philosophy starts with Anaximander of Miletus in Asia Minor, a fellow-citizen of Thales. He was the first who dared to write a treatise in prose, which has been called traditionally On Nature. This book has been lost, although it probably was available in the library of the Lyceum at the times of Aristotle and his successor Theophrastus. It is said that Apollodorus, in the second century BCE, stumbled upon a copy of it, perhaps in the famous library of Alexandria. Recently, evidence has appeared that it was part of the collection of the library of Taormina in Sicily, where a fragment of a catalogue has been found, on which Anaximander’s name can be read. Only one fragment of the book has come down to us, quoted by Simplicius (after Theophrastus), in the sixth century AD. It is perhaps the most famous and most discussed phrase in the history of philosophy….” http://www.iep.utm.edu/anaximan/

Oct 13 '14
contingent-dreams:

lunar-raspberry:

"And what do we say to death?""Not today."

"The fuck out my face"

contingent-dreams:

lunar-raspberry:

"And what do we say to death?"

"Not today."

"The fuck out my face"

Oct 13 '14

fascist-eagle:

Italy - The Centurion

A centurion (Latin: centurio; Ancient Greek: κεντυρίων) was a professional officer of the Roman army after the Marian reforms of 107 B.C. In the Roman infantry, centurions initially commanded a centuria or “century”. Centuries, or centuriae, developed from the Roman tribal system under the Servian reforms and could contain 200 to 1000 men. Later, generals and Caesars further manipulated these numbers with double and half-strength units. Julius Caesar, for instance, made the first century double strength.

Centurions often suffered heavy casualties in battle, generally fighting alongside the legionaries they commanded. They usually led from the front, occupying a position at the front right of the century formation. They could be identified by the transverse horse-hair crest on top of their helmet, their metal greaves and (unlike the legionaries) the sword worn on the left, like all Roman officers. They led and inspired their men by example. They also sought to display the skill and courage that may have brought them to their rank in the first place. It is for these reasons that they often suffered a disproportionate number of casualties.

Being held personally responsible for the training and discipline of the legionaries under their command, centurions had a well-deserved reputation for dealing out harsh punishment. In The Annals, Tacitus tells the story of one known as ‘Cedo Alteram’ - which roughly translates to ‘Gimme Another’: “The mutinous soldiers thrust out the tribunes and the camp-prefect; they plundered the baggage of the fugitives, and then killed a centurion, Lucilius, to whom, with soldier’s humour, they had given the nickname ‘Gimme Another’, because when he had broken one vine-stick across a soldier’s back, he would call in a loud voice for another… and another.” The vine-stick mentioned above by Tacitus was called a vitis; it was a symbol of the centurion’s authority and the implement with which he would mete out punishment.

Evidence suggests that centurions had important social status and held powerful positions in society. They seem to have received their status according to their rank. On retirement they could be eligible for employment as Lictors. Centurions had to be literate, have connections (letters of recommendation), be at least 30 years of age, and had already served a few years in the military.

"The centurion in the infantry is chosen for his size, strength and dexterity in throwing his missile weapons and for his skill in the use of his sword and shield; in short for his expertness in all the exercises. He is to be vigilant, temperate, active and readier to execute the orders he receives than to talk; Strict in exercising and keeping up proper discipline among his soldiers, in obliging them to appear clean and well-dressed and to have their arms constantly rubbed and bright."

-(Vegetius. De Re Militari, II, 14 )